Senseless 19th Century Baseball Deaths: Lew Brown

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Lew Brown Obit Done

Lew Brown played for Providence, at least two Boston clubs, and assorted other teams during a seven-year career. He retired, it would seem, following his age-26 season. In January of 1889, just weeks short of his 31st birthday, he somehow broke his kneepan (an antiquated word for kneecap) on a stone cuspiodor (i.e. a spittoon) whilst wrestling. Then, somehow, he immediately contracted pneumonia, became delirious, and then died.

Cause of death, ultimately: the 19th century.

Click image to embiggen. Notice of death care of Boston Globe. Credit to Deadball Era for data, as well.

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Carson Cistulli has published a book of aphorisms called Spirited Ejaculations of a New Enthusiast.

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JayT
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JayT

Because he liked wrestling or because Charles the Wrestler is a badass?

The eldest of the three wrestled with Charles, the
duke’s wrestler; which Charles in a moment threw him
and broke three of his ribs, that there is little
hope of life in him: so he served the second, and
so the third. Yonder they lie; the poor old man,
their father, making such pitiful dole over them
that all the beholders take his part with weeping.
As You Like It Act I, Scene ii